2022 AMSC: SportsConnect

Connect with industry leaders and current content at the elite, Sports-only PT conference: SportsConnect.



1.5CEU / 15 Credit Hours

There are many conferences for physical therapists, but only one that focuses exclusively on sports: AASPT's Annual Meeting and Scientific Conference (AMSC).

Join us Sept 21-24, in Indianapolis to connect with:
  • the latest in sports-PT research
  • the best clinical sports-PT practices
  • movers and shakers in sports-PT

Come discover why we're calling AMSC 22 SportsConnect.

Why Attend?

Network

  • Smaller, more intimate conference where you are much more likely to meet and spend time with professionals who can impact your career
  • Special networking events designed to connect early-career professionals with mid- to late-career professionals

Learn

  • Content is balanced between current clinical practices and the latest scientific research
  • The widest range of sports-focused information

Featured Programs

Get a load of this!

Applying appropriate loads across the continuum of lower extremity rehabilitation
- Marisa Pontillo, PT, PhD, DPT, SCS
- Laura Opstedal, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, USAW-2
- Daniel Larson, PT, DPT, ATC, SCS, CSCS

Collaboration Through Innovation:

Creating Novel Clinical Service Delivery Though Interprofessional Education, Research, and Community Partnerships
- Caroline Brunst, PT, DPT, AT
- John DeWitt, PT, DPT, AT
- Stephanie Di Stasi, PT, PhD
- Greg Hock, PT, DPT, OCS

Neuroplasticity across concussion management:

Enhancing assessment and functional task specific training utilizing the clinical trajectory model of recovery
- Rebecca Bliss, PT, DPT, DHSc
- Alex Habegger, PT, DPT

You Throw How Hard?

Treating the Baseball Athlete
- Marisa Pontillo, PT, PhD, DPT, SCS
- Mike Reinold, PT, DPT, ATC, CSCS
- Eric Bellm, PT, DPT, OCS

Click the icon for the full schedule! 

Pricing

Pre-July 15 July 16 Aug 16
Student-Members:  $200 $250  $300
Members:  $400 $450  $500
Non-Members:  $500 $550  $600

Registration includes access to any recorded programs from the conference that we post in our Learning Center after the event.

Hotel

Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
One South Capitol Avenue Indianapolis, IN 46204

The nightly room rate is $162.00++ To book your stay within the discounted AASPT room block, click the button below. The hotel room block cutoff date is Monday, August 15, 2022. Please note that the AASPT rate will not be honored after this date.

Book my Room

Click here to read the full terms and conditions. Please note the cancelation policy:

All cancellation requests must be in writing and sent to AASPT’s Director of Member Engagement. Cancellations received at or before August 22, 2022, 11:50 EDT (30 days prior to the start of the event) will receive a full refund. There is a $100.00 cancellation fee for cancellations received after August 22, 2022, and at or before September 11, 2022 11:59 EDT (10 days prior to the start of the event). No refunds will be made for cancellations received on or after September 11, 2022.

Important!

Many of these events have limited seating—particularly the DinnerConnects and the Break-Out Sessions. Make sure you grab your seat when you register!

 

When
9/21/2022 - 9/24/2022
Where
Hyatt Regency Indianapolis One South Capitol Avenue Indianapolis, IN 46204 UNITED STATES

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Program

Wednesday, 21 September 2022

Description
Location: Regency Ballroom Lobby
Category
General Sessions
Time
12:00 PM - 6:00 PM
12:00 PM
TBD
Category
General Sessions
Time
1:00 PM - 6:00 PM
1:00 PM

Thursday, 22 September 2022

Description
Location: Cosmopolitan Ballroom Lobby
Category
General Sessions
Time
7:00 AM - 8:00 AM
7:00 AM
Delivered by President Mike Reinold

Location: Regency A/B
Category
General Sessions
Time
8:00 AM - 8:15 AM
8:00 AM

Creating Novel Clinical Service Delivery Though Interprofessional Education, Research, and Community Partnerships

Interprofessional education (IPE) and collaboration have long been proposed to enhance valued based care by improving outcome and lowering cost.  Despite this, several barriers exist limiting use of IPE and more significantly interprofessional collaboration (IPC).   In sports science and sports medicine, interprofessional education has shown positive attributes amongst sports medicine professionals, however IPC is limited.    The purpose of this session is to discuss the implementation of novel post-professional education, collaborative clinical research, and clinical team education/community partnerships to promote relational practice and best practice outcomes at a large academic medical center.   The session will focus on novel service care delivery involving an upper extremity athlete fellowship, share-decision making hip research; and knee specialty team community partnerships.   Presenters will describe how evidence-driven care is fostered through these partnerships as well as the impact on internal and external stokeholds.   Barriers and facilitators of IPE and IPC will be also be discussed to promote change regardless of the institutional model.

    - Caroline Brunst, PT, DPT, AT
    - John DeWitt, PT, DPT, AT
    - Stephanie Di Stasi, PT, PhD
    - Greg Hock, PT, DPT, OCS


Location: Regency A/B
Category
General Sessions
Time
8:15 AM - 9:45 AM
8:15 AM
Knee SIG: ACL ABC’s, do we really know D through Z?!  Implementing the BEST of what we KNOW: Rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction (ACLR) remains one of the most disputed topics among healthcare professionals. Criterion-based progressions have predominantly been used to help guide clinicians with progressions in the rehabilitation process. However, many lack consensus, often differ from available evidence, have failed to reduce the unacceptably high re-tear rate amongst athletes returning to sport, and/or are simply, not followed. A recently published article on Rehabilitation Guidelines following ACLR utilized University-based clinical data to inform objective milestones to guide clinician’s decision making in the management of athletes after ACLR. Implementing guidelines remains a challenge for numerous reasons. Our presentation seeks to acknowledge the shortcomings within our rehabilitation strategies, highlight the areas in need of ongoing research and provide easily translatable clinical skills to immediately improve the clinical management of athletes following ACLR. Understanding these guidelines will not only help to improve outcomes post ACLR but will hopefully decrease the sequelae that we continue to see in perpetuity. 
(Giordano, Brinlee)

Location: Regency E/F
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
10:00 AM - 11:15 AM
10:00 AM
Running SIG: Posterior Tibialis Tendon Dysfunction is a common foot pathology with varying degrees of severity. The milder cases can be more of a nuisance however the more severe cases can be quite debilitating. Runners with this issue may be forced to modify their gait or training programs to be able to continue with their training. This presentation will review how to classify posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction, both non operative and operative treatment options will be discussed as will strategies to either continue or return to running following this diagnosis. 
(Greenberg, Fant, Barnet) 

Location: Theory
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
10:00 AM - 11:15 AM
10:00 AM

Tactical SIG: Pragmatic Approach to Returning Military Tactical Athletes to Duty:  Musculoskeletal injuries are undeniable prevalent and burdensome in tactical athletes, and are the leading cause of medical encounters across all U.S. military branches. Occupational demands (e.g., load carriage) place military tactical athletes at an increased risk of musculoskeletal injury, as well as predispose the body to detrimental long-term physiological effects creating a financial burden and impact on force readiness due to time lost. Unfortunately, current literature often utilizes self-reported level of function to determine return to duty status. Following injury, decisions to return to duty are frequently deferred to clinicians’ opinion, or use time-based criteria, with no one accepted functional testing algorithm consistently utilized across institutions and/or branches. Currently utilized functional testing algorithms may not consider the unique biomechanical demands of military tactical athletes. Additionally, when an injury occurs, bridging the gap between end stage rehabilitation and performance training to return to prior physical demands can be one of the most challenging aspects within rehabilitation and must be considered when attempting to optimize warfighter readiness. Throughout the process of returning military tactical athletes to duty, a pragmatic, interdisciplinary approach is warranted, considering time and resources allocated for intervention and assessment.
(Pontillo, Lazicki, Buckingham)

Location: Vision
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
10:00 AM - 11:15 AM
10:00 AM
Golf SIG: Over the last few years three dimensional analysis of the golf swing have led us to find a distinctive pattern that the worlds best players all exhibit.  This is referred to as the kinematic sequence of the golf swing.  This analysis is helpful for us as PT’s to determine swing efficiency and how well the player can transfer energy from the ground out to the club.  It can also help us find potential pit falls and inefficiencies that can potentially lead to an injury in the player.  If we can find those power leaks early on, then the player will not have to deal with an injury but can perform at a higher level for a longer period of time.  I will highlight the dynamic interaction of the hip joint and the low back joints and their roles in transferring the energy from the LE to the UE and why the low back is the most commonly injured joint in amateur golfers.  I will discuss this application with other rotational sports and what it can mean for the everyday sports physical therapist. 
(Rhodes)

Location: Vision
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
11:30 AM - 12:45 PM
11:30 AM

Performance Enhancement SIG: Treating the Every Day Athlete Like A Pro – Multidisciplinary Care in an Insurance Based Model
Current recommendations for timing of return to sport following ACL reconstruction suggest a minimum time of 9-months. Quadriceps strength, progressive activity exposure time, and time from surgery are recognized as important prognostic indicators in determining an athlete’s ability to successfully return to competitive sports participation. The literature has consistently highlighted ongoing impairments in surgical limb performance in athletes returning to sport, despite participation in structured post- operative physical therapy care. Depressed strength and movement quality at the time of return to sport potentially leads to an increased risk of knee re-injury. Current clinic-based physical therapy models may not provide access to appropriate levels of training stimulus needed for successful return to sport due to lack of equipment, insufficient strength program design and/or decreased activity exposure. These gaps in care leave athletes with impairments that impact both their short and long term recovery. Teamwork and collaboration with other, skilled professionals, such as athletic trainers, strength coaches and skill coaches, can augment physical therapy care within a patient’s recovery plan. Applying a multi-disciplinary, team-based approach throughout the phases of rehabilitation helps patients overcome deficits that are otherwise difficult to overcome with traditional clinic-based physical therapy alone. Our team will discuss the importance of collaboration within a multidisciplinary rehabilitation model. We will discuss current pitfalls with physical therapy access, our strategies for navigating them, and how a multidisciplinary model can positively impact the potential for an athlete to successfully return to competitive sports participation.
(Monson, Solie, O’Keefe, Kiely)

Location: Theory
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
11:30 AM - 12:45 PM
11:30 AM

Shoulder SIG: Evidenced-Based Postoperative Upper Extremity Testing Criteria for Informing Rehabilitation Progression and Return-to-Sport Decisions: Despite increased research showing the benefit of progressive return to play testing for the upper extremity, there is no clear agreement on steps to implement testing protocols, adapt tests given resources and populations, or integrate tests in clinical practice.  Our presentation plans to address these gaps by providing rationale for test selection, considerations for creating your own testing battery, and discussion of strategies to best interpret the data for immediate use with patients.    We will describe how to implement an evidenced based upper extremity return to sport objective testing plan following surgical intervention.  The discussion will include examples of tests for each category of function (i.e. strength, stability, function, and plyometrics) and how to modify them with available resources at different clinical settings. We will also discuss progressions as patient function increases post-operatively.  Case examples will be presented to demonstrate each step in the process from data collection, to processing, to reporting and interpreting, to implementation of recommendations.
(Lanser, Thein-Nissenbaum)

Location: Regency E/F
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
11:30 AM - 12:45 PM
11:30 AM
Concussion SIG: Fear Avoidance Behaviors in Concussion Management... Evidenced Based Strategies for Safe Return to Play: Characteristics of individuals at risk for post-concussive syndrome (PCS) include a previous history of psychological conditions such as anxiety, depression and/or mood disorders, history of headaches/migraines and post-concussive vestibular ocular dysfunction. The nature and extent of PCS is complex and has been associated with fear-avoidance behaviors that interfere with full return to sport. Fear-avoidance behavior has been recently shown to be a predictor of adverse clinical outcomes and increased risk of subsequent injury following concussion. The role of residual anxiety and fear can be a factor in full rehabilitation and the return to sport process.   Patients with mTBI have potential to misinterpret information regarding their injury, catastrophizing their symptomology, with resultant increased levels of anxiety and avoidance behavior over time. Physical therapists are in a unique role to alter behaviors contributing to protracted recovery.  Early recognition and intervention utilizing active rehabilitation, educational strategies, and collaboration with other healthcare team members has the potential to decrease the psychological burden associated with protracted recovery as well as ensure safe return to play. This session aims to equip attendees with formal assessment methods to recognize anxiety/fear contributing to slowed recovery as well as demonstrate active strategies and educational framework for improved outcomes. 
(Bliss, Bridges)

Location: Vision
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
2:00 PM

Performance Enhancement SIG: "I'm Not Trying to Be the Best at Exercising" - Adaptation or Acquisition? In sports physical therapy it is often unknown whether the primary mediator of recovery from injury is physiological adaptation or skill acquisition. In the case of physiological adaptation, it is thought that improving tissue tolerance and capacity drives the ability to return to one’s prior level of function. Many argue that the skill acquisition of sport-specific movements or tasks plays a strong role in the recovery following injury, and is more likely to explain the early effects seen in rehabilitation. The panel will discuss the relevant contributions of adaptation and acquisition in three specific areas of rehabilitation: performing arts injuries, running injuries, and following ACL reconstruction. The format of this session will be a moderated panel discussion.
(Tuori, Graham, Oft, Juneau)

Location: Regency E/F
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
2:00 PM

Female Athlete SIG: Stabilization of the pelvis and foot are often goals in rehabilitation of the running athlete. Pelvic and foot dynamic stability are necessary for optimal running gait. Some runners experience impairments in the pelvic floor or foot that benefit from use of an orthotic or other device to assist in stabilization and offloading in conjunction with specific strengthening exercises to address underlying impairments. For the pelvic floor, pessaries and other devices may be used. Cooperation in a multidisciplinary team is important for differential diagnosis and robust care of an athlete who requires fitting and use of a pessary.  With regards to the foot, wedges, posts and other accommodations can be used to help shift loads to tissues more able to handle the loads while an injured tissue can heal.  This session will describe how orthotics may be utilized to treat runners in conjunction with exercise and manual therapy in the physical therapy setting. 
(Greenberg, Olson)

Location: Theory
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
2:00 PM

You Throw How Hard? Treating the Baseball Athlete

The overhead pitching motion in baseball is a coordinated sequence of movements that subjects the shoulder to extreme forces; rotational speed of the arm can reach greater than 7000°/s with joint compression and distraction forces of more than 1000 N during a pitch. The ultimate goal of this complex, dynamic activity is to generate high ball velocity and accuracy. However, these stresses inevitably predispose these athletes to adaptive changes and subsequent upper extremity injuries. As it is known that shoulder injuries are multifactorial, injury prevention and rehabilitation can be overwhelming to the clinician who is attempting to identify and address internal and external risk factors.  Although baseball medicine continues to advance our knowledge in biomechanics, injury prevention, and rehabilitation, translating the plethora of research into clinical application can be challenging. Recent advances in the care of the baseball athlete through the continuum of care -preinjury though end stage rehabilitation- will be examined from a sport-specific perspective in this session. This course will overview the spectrum of sports physical therapy care for baseball pitchers, from injury prevention, to nonoperative care, to postoperative rehabilitation.

    - Marisa Pontillo, PT, PhD, DPT, SCS
    - Mike Reinold, PT, DPT, ATC, CSCS
    - Eric Bellm, PT, DPT, OCS


Location: Regency A/B
Category
General Sessions
Time
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
3:30 PM
Location: TBD

Max 10 members!

Enjoy dinner and conversation with members of the SIG leadership and, at some tables, the Executive Committee.
(You have to pay for your meal.)

Category
DinnerConnect
Time
8:00 PM - 9:30 PM
8:00 PM
Location: TBD

Max 10 members!

Enjoy dinner and conversation with members of the SIG leadership and, at some tables, the Executive Committee.
(You have to pay for your meal.)

Category
DinnerConnect
Time
8:00 PM - 9:30 PM
8:00 PM
Location: TBD

Max 10 members!

Enjoy dinner and conversation with members of the SIG leadership and, at some tables, the Executive Committee.
(You have to pay for your meal.)

Category
DinnerConnect
Time
8:00 PM - 9:30 PM
8:00 PM
Location: TBD

Max 10 members!

Enjoy dinner and conversation with members of the SIG leadership and, at some tables, the Executive Committee.
(You have to pay for your meal.)

Category
DinnerConnect
Time
8:00 PM - 9:30 PM
8:00 PM
Location: TBD

Max 10 members!

Enjoy dinner and conversation with members of the SIG leadership and, at some tables, the Executive Committee.
(You have to pay for your meal.)

Category
DinnerConnect
Time
8:00 PM - 9:30 PM
8:00 PM
Location: TBD

Max 10 members!

Enjoy dinner and conversation with members of the SIG leadership and, at some tables, the Executive Committee.
(You have to pay for your meal.)

Category
DinnerConnect
Time
8:00 PM - 9:30 PM
8:00 PM
Location: TBD

Max 10 members!

Enjoy dinner and conversation with members of the SIG leadership and, at some tables, the Executive Committee.
(You have to pay for your meal.)

Category
DinnerConnect
Time
8:00 PM - 9:30 PM
8:00 PM

Friday, 23 September 2022

Description

College & Pro Sports SIG:  Articular Cartilage: Rehabilitation Pearls and Return to Sport for the High Level Athlete    This course presents a review of current concepts in articular cartilage injuries, surgical intervention and rehabilitation (beginning and advanced) in the high demand athlete. Current advances in surgical technique and further research in this area have changed some ways we look at how we rehab after this surgery. This course will discuss cartilage damage in the high demand athlete, (active adult, professional) current surgical techniques and outcomes, post-operative rehabilitation progression (conservative vs. accelerated), as well as the progression towards return to sport and technological advances for testing for the novice to elite athlete.
(Marrone, Patel, Vignona)

Location: Regency E/F
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
8:00 AM
Location: Vision
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
8:00 AM

Shoulder SIG: Throwing 'bows: When Did We Forget the Basics of Treating Elbows?  Understandably, the shoulder receives a lot of attention when it comes to the biomechanics of sport and injury association with the upper extremity. Athletes who engage in overhead sports have a high likelihood of encountering a shoulder injury, however depending on the sport, elbow injuries can actually be more common. Unfortunately, a vast majority of the recent literature regarding athletic elbow injuries is centered around UCL reconstructions and does not provide for a well-rounded understanding of the functional elbow in practice. Furthermore, there is a paucity in clinical guidelines and rehabilitation recommendations regarding sports injuries about the elbow which lends to large variations in practice - potentially to the detriment of the patient. If you've observed social media "influencer" trends over the past few years, this point becomes readily evident. We've come to a much better understanding of the kinetic stressors experienced during throwing/hitting, pushing, and pulling. It's time to regain clarity with our clinical approach to the elbow and improve outcomes through reasoning and meaningful treatment interventions.
(Hedt, Gooch, Holland)

Location: Theory
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
8:00 AM

Neuroplasticity across concussion management: Enhancing assessment and functional task specific training utilizing the clinical trajectory model of recovery

Principles of neuroplasticity have gained recent traction in the world of sports rehabilitation. Assessment and interventional strategies need to be targeted to specific tasks that parallel what athletes are required to do on the field. The brain’s ability to organize multi-task interactions is an essential component of motor control and postural stability that requires  interaction of multiple sensory and motor systems needed for sport.  Current objective assessment tools do not routinely assess the dual-task paradigm required for play. Maintaining balance during dual or multi-tasking is a complex outcome of trunk stability and the sensory-motor and/or automatic central functions and has been suggested to be a potential contributor of residual higher level neuromotor control deficits responsible for subsequent lower extremity musculoskeletal injury following concussion.Utilizing functional task specific training that targets impairments can enhance motor re-learning, improve outcomes, and prevent protracted recovery.  This session will take a deep dive into application of neuroplasticity principles specific to concussion clinical trajectories. This includes cervical, ocular, vestibular, and exertional constructs .  The dual task paradigm as it relates to application of neuroplastic  strategies will also be highlighted for improved assurance that the appropriate constructs have been addressed prior to return to play.

    - Rebecca Bliss, PT, DPT, DHSc
    - Alex Habegger, PT, DPT


Location: Regency A/B
Category
General Sessions
Time
9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
9:30 AM

Shoulder SIG: How to Implement Field-Expedient Arm Care Screening to Identify Injury Risk Factors in Baseball Players
Injury prevention efforts have fallen short in baseball and players are still getting injured at alarming rates. Whether you are rehabilitating a pitcher or helping a team with their arm care system, there are certain risk factors and activities that are essential to the health and performance of your player. In this presentation, you will learn how to easily identify injury risk factors through simple testing procedures. Whether you are returning a player to sport after injury or designing a prevention program, there are key risk factors that must be considered for optimal arm care programming. This presentation is designed to enable the physical therapists & athletic trainers to effectively design and implement this information immediately.
(Uhl, Matsel)

Location: Regency E/F
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
11:15 AM

Knee SIG: Getting the Right Picture at the Right Time: Diagnostic Imaging Referrals for the Sports PT
Sports physical therapists routinely use the results of imaging studies to make patient care decisions. Many states allow physical therapists to sign referrals for imaging studies and all physical therapists can recommend imaging to other clinicians. It is imperative the sports physical therapist is well prepared to rule out traumatic injuries requiring care outside the scope of physical therapist practice. This course will provide attendees the knowledge, skills, and confidence to sign appropriate diagnostic imaging referrals in sports physical therapy settings. Through lecture and case examples, attendees will learn how to properly order specific imaging studies to evaluate common injuries. Attendees will also understand the rights, responsibilities, and best practices for using radiographic imaging in clinical practice as well as situations when advanced imaging is indicated. Attendees of this course will feel prepared to order the right diagnostic imaging study at the right time.
(Nelson, Tauferner)

Location: Theory
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
11:15 AM

Specialization SIG: Winner, Winner…Navigating Success from Application to Board Certification in a Collegiate-Based Sports Residency
Over the last two decades, sports residency programs have grown in popularity. There are currently 60 accredited programs and 13 in the developmental and candidacy status. Despite the growth in the number of programs, residency positions are still relatively few and remain highly competitive. This presentation serves as a discussion for students and early career professionals who wish to pursue residency training. It will discuss residency components specific to a collegiate-based program and offer information on navigating the application process, preparing for a successful experience, and forming strategies for passing the Board Certification exam. Additionally, this presentation will include suggestions for standing out amongst a sea of applicants, and will review competencies and behaviors that foster success, from the perspective of a residency coordinator, mentors, and application review panel.
(Taylor, Brown, Luczkowski, Moseley, Wason)

Location: Vision
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
11:15 AM

Specialization SIG: This course is designed to provide the attendees with “clinical pearls” that may be used to address specific patient presentations.  Some of these conditions may be described as the “tough ones” that all clinicians struggle to provide optimal outcomes.  Experienced clinicians will discuss interpretation of evidence that is linked to clinical decision-making and problem solving for patients with difficult pathologies.  Audiovisuals will be used to demonstrate manual and therapeutic exercise techniques used to progress clinically challenging patients. 
(Jenkins, Beiswenger, Giordano, Malone)

Location: Vision
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
2:00 PM

Shoulder SIG: Evaluation, Treatment and Return to Throwing Criteria for the Overhead Athlete
Injuries in the throwing athlete continue to trend upward despite advances in medical care and treatment techniques. These injuries continue to have a significant performance and economic impact on youth, collegiate and professional baseball organizations. The medical team, including physical therapists, must balance the need for efficient and safe return after injury. Recent research is growing in relation to evaluation and return-to-throwing progression, however no clear consensus exists. Questions exists for the medical and performance practitioners in regards to appropriate return-to-throwing criteria and progression. Technology, including motion analysis and wearables, has become a popular adjunct in the monitoring of return-to-throwing progression. This session will detail the return-to-throwing criteria and evaluation methods used in overhead athletes. This session will discuss the implementation of technology in evaluation, progression and workload management. This session will also review the clinical decision making used by expert therapists to individualize the return to play process, combining the most recent evidence and experience.
(Sgroi, Jones, Andrews)

Location: Regency E/F
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
2:00 PM

Knee SIG: Save the Meniscus! Rehabilitation and Return to Sport following Meniscus Injury and Surgical Repair
Meniscus tears in the knee can be debilitating injuries resulting in pain, dysfunction, and increased stress on the underlying joint cartilage, especially in individuals returning to a high demand lifestyle. Not all meniscus injuries are the same and when surgical intervention is required different techniques are performed to address unique tear patterns. This session will first discuss the differences between what we classify as “stable” and “unstable” meniscal tear types and the surgical techniques used to address them within the practice of Dr. Robert LaPrade. Our team will then share our rehabilitation protocols with emphasis on critical precautions, phase by phase progressions, and pearls and pitfalls common along the way. We will share our timelines and strategies to advance patients through key rehabilitation milestones including return to running, jumping, cutting, heavy load lifting, practice and sport. We will discuss the return to sport testing and decision making process and review known outcomes reported in the literature and observed within our center for recovery and return to sport following meniscus repair.
(Monson, LaPrade, O’Keefe, Kiely)

Location: Theory
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
2:00 PM

Get a load of this! Applying appropriate loads across the continuum of lower extremity rehabilitation

Recently, there has been substantial research relating training load to injury. However, the focus is typically external workload, and while preventing future injury should be considered, loading the lower extremity appropriately throughout all phases of rehabilitation can be nebulous for clinicians. Early in rehabilitation, appropriate loading is necessary to prepare the athlete for advanced exercises (e.g., power and agility work); however, tissue healing properties must also be considered, leaving the therapist to strike a delicate balance between protecting injured tissues and applying appropriately aggressive loading. This is further complicated by the lack of evidence regarding appropriate training load for recently injured or post-operative diagnoses. Patients must achieve the necessary mobility, neuromuscular control, and strength to ensure sufficient tissue adaptation has taken place prior to entering the terminal phases of rehabilitation, where the gap between rehabilitation and competition is bridged through progressive loading. Throughout the process, it is also necessary for clinicians to understand clinical measurement tools to monitor internal loads to establish appropriate stimulus necessary for ideal biological change. Although most patients show improvements in metrics with appropriate loading, there are cases where individuals will not progress as expected secondary to other factors, such as non-responders, kinesiophobia, and non-musculoskeletal comorbidities. 

    - Marisa Pontillo, PT, PhD, DPT, SCS
    - Laura Opstedal, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, USAW-2
    - Daniel Larson, PT, DPT, ATC, SCS, CSCS


Location: Regency A/B
Category
General Sessions
Time
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
3:30 PM
Location: Regency Foyer

Enjoy some cocktails while you review the 20 research posters and speak with their authors.

Category
Special Events
Time
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
5:30 PM
Location: Regency A/B

It's like speed-dating for your career! One of the best networking events in the PT world.

Category
Special Events
Time
7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
7:30 PM

Saturday, 24 September 2022

Description
Knee SIG: The history and evolution of surgery and rehabilitation following an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction
K Donald Shelbourne, MD; Scot Bauman, PT, DPT

Location: Regency A/B
Category
General Sessions
Time
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
8:00 AM

Performance Enhancement SIG: The return to sport process after a major injury imposes specific constraints upon the athlete and practitioner that delay the reintroduction of normal training loads and various menu items. The aim of this talk will be to discuss ways to decrease “training gaps” in the return to sport process. These training gaps can often impede long term development and long-term data suggests that these physical competencies are not addressed or normalized years after return to sport. The presenters will discuss various ways to introduce training that aids the athlete in adequately preparing for the training demands involved in their sport.
(Boykin, Evans)

Location: Theory
Category
Break-Out Sessions
When
9/24/2022 9:30 AM - 9/25/2022 10:45 AM
9:30 AM

Knee SIG: Rehabilitation Considerations for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with the Quadriceps Tendon Autograft
Traditionally, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) or hamstring tendon (HT) autograft has been the preferred surgical treatment for patients returning to level-1 sport. More recently, international utilization of the quadriceps tendon (QT) autograft for primary and revision ACLR has increased in popularity, with literature reporting ACLR with the QT may yield less donor site morbidity than the BPTB and better patient-reported outcomes than the HT; Anatomic and biomechanical studies have highlighted the robust properties of the QT itself, with superior levels of collagen density, length, size and load-to-failure strength than the BPTB. However, due to the multiple myotendinous origins of the quadriceps tendon, the QT has the potential for more variability in graft structure and fiber orientation than the BPTB and HT. Although previous literature has described rehabilitation considerations for the BPTB and HT autografts, there is less published with respect to the QT. Therefore, the purpose of this AASPT session would be to present the key rehabilitation considerations after ACLR with the QT, as well as further highlight the need for procedure-specific rehabilitation strategies after ACLR by comparing the QT to the BPTB and HT autografts.    
(Monson, Solie, Palmer, Weigand, Kiely)

Location: Vision
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
9:30 AM

Shoulder SIG: The Forgotten Overhead Athlete: Return to Olympic Lifting after Shoulder Instability
The sport of Olympic weightlifting has grown significantly in popularity in the United States over the last several decades. Additionally the Olympic lifting movements are widely utilized in strength and conditioning programs and other training methodologies such as CrossFit. Given the increase in utilization of Olympic lifts in athletic performance training, there is a need to develop comprehensive rehabilitation strategies for the overhead strength athlete. While a plethora of rehabilitation literature exists regarding rehabilitation of the overhead athlete, little attention has been paid to this unique overhead strength athlete. This presentation will review the sport of Olympic weightlifting, discuss the unique biomechanical demands of the main Olympic lifts in the context of shoulder injury, and propose a return to sport progression following a glenohumeral anterior instability injury.
(Barber, Keller, Crevani)

Location: Regency E/F
Category
Break-Out Sessions
Time
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
9:30 AM
 

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